Posts Tagged ‘GENNOVATE’

Gender norms, agency and agricultural innovation in Mexico

MAIZE Annual Report 2014

This story first appeared in the MAIZE Annual Report 2014. Read the full version here

In over 125 agricultural communities in 26 countries, a field study of gender norms, agency and agricultural innovation, known as GENNOVATE, is now underway. MAIZE and WHEAT are funding over half of the studies. The huge evidence base generated will help spur the necessary transformation in how gender is included in agricultural research for development.

A team of researchers from CIMMYT carried out the first GENNOVATE fieldwork in Mexico in 2014, identifying six communities in the states of Chiapas and Oaxaca to represent the greatest degree of economic and social diversity possible, a practice followed in studies around the world.

Gennovate: Coding the CRP Global Study on Gender Norms

Diana López, Principal Research Assistant & Data Manager (first from left), Patti Petesch, Expert Advisor (second from left), Nadezda Amaya, Regional Gender Research Specialist (CIP-RTB); (fourth from left), and Lone Badstue, Strategic Leader, Gender Research (fifth from left) stand with prospective coders at the closure of the workshop. Photo: Jorge Mendez, CIMMYT.

Diana López, Principal Research Assistant & Data Manager (first from left), Patti Petesch, Expert Advisor (second from left), Nadezda Amaya, Regional Gender Research Specialist (CIP-RTB); (fourth from left), and Lone Badstue, Strategic Leader, Gender Research (fifth from left) stand with prospective coders at the closure of the workshop. Photo: Jorge Mendez, CIMMYT.

Patti Petesch, Lone Badstue and Diana López of CIMMYT’s gender unit gave a training workshop at El Batán, Mexico, during 7-17 April on systematic content analysis and coding for the Global Study on Gender Norms, Agency and Innovation in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management, or “Gennovate.” A collaborative initiative of 13 CGIAR research programs, this global qualitative field study will reach approximately 125 villages in 25 countries worldwide, according to Badstue.