Posts Tagged ‘CGIAR MAIZE’

Maize CRP Photo Contest

Call for Entries

The CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE) is holding a photo contest to highlight the diversity of maize, its harvest and use around the world. The theme is Harvest Diversity. We are looking for bright and engaging images that celebrate harvest time – be it action shots of harvesting maize in the field, or close up images of maize ears.

Winners: Five winning photos will be featured and credited across MAIZE social media channels and will be among the first images shared on the new MAIZE Instagram feed, launching in early 2019. The winning photos will also be featured in the next MAIZE Newsletter in early 2019.

Eligibility: Open to everyone anywhere in the world

Entry: All entries should be submitted via this online submission form by January 31 2019

For any questions or issues, contact us at c.cowan@cgiar.org.

We will notify you via email if your photo has been chosen as a winning entry.

GENNOVATE special issue draws on the voices of women and men in agriculture

by Carolyn Cowan

A diverse and inclusive agricultural framework can be fostered by involving both women and men from different socioeconomic backgrounds and age groups in agricultural innovation interventions. Such an approach can ensure equitable access to resources while stimulating local innovation and development outcomes. Achieving this aim is a complex task. Gender-focused agricultural research for development can inform and streamline the process.

A special issue of the Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security comprises a set of six studies drawing on data collected for the GENNOVATE initiative – a CIMMYT-led, cross-CRP global comparative research initiative, part-funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE). The initiative gathered the perspectives and experiences of over 7000 women and men from diverse backgrounds and varied age groups in 137 rural communities across 26 countries during individual interviews, focus groups and community discussions. The special issue reveals a lot about what influences women’s and men’s agency and empowerment to utilize agricultural innovations to improve their livelihoods.

A maize farmer collects her harvest. Photo: P.Lowe/CIMMYT

Central to the studies is the concept of gender ‘norms’ which are social rules surrounding women’s and men’s expected roles and behaviors. Such ‘norms’ can influence a person’s ability to access, adopt, adapt and benefit from innovations in agricultural and natural resource management.

International experts to convene for 13th Asian Maize Conference

International experts to convene in Ludhiana, India, to discuss the way forward to increase climate resilience and productivity of maize, and to strengthen maize-based cropping systems in Asia.

A farmer checks her maize as it comes out of a shelling machine powered by a 4-wheel tractor, Nepal. Photo: CIMMYT/P.Lowe

Ludhiana, India (CIMMYT)—Maize is one of the most important crops in Asia alongside rice and wheat, and provides important economic opportunities to smallholder farmers. The 13th Asian Maize Conference in Ludhiana, India (October 8-10) will bring together key Asian maize partners and global experts to discuss the present status, challenges, and future opportunities for enhancing maize for food, feed, nutrition and environmental security in Asia. The conference is jointly organized by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), the ICAR-Indian Institute of Maize Research (ICAR-IIMR), Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), and the Borlaug Institute for South Asia (BISA).

Toxin-producing fungal strains can now be detected in maize field soils with a new technique

by Alexander Loladze and Carolyn Cowan

Maize ear infected with Aspergillus flavus. Photo: Maize Pathology Laboratory/CIMMYT

A novel approach allows the detection of aflatoxin-producing fungi in maize fields. A new study explains the technique and how it was tested. “Detection of Aflatoxigenic and Atoxigenic Mexican Aspergillus Strains by the Dichlorvos–Ammonia (DV–AM) Method” was developed in collaboration between scientists from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), the Japanese National Agriculture and Food Organization (NARO) and Fukui University of Technology, funded in part by the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE).