Young innovator Lucio Reinoso is helping farmers to maximize maize production while caring for the environment

Lucio Reinoso is an agronomist with a master’s degree in agricultural sciences from the National Southern University, Argentina. Lucio and his team at the National University of Rio Negro and the INTA Lower Valley Experimental Station developed a new seeder that allows farmers to sow their maize using the same furrow from the year before and leaving behind crop residue on the surface, helping them to implement conservation agriculture practices and minimize impacts on the environment. He was recently awarded the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America in the category of researcher for his involvement in this work.

The awards, an initiative of the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), seek to recognize the contributions of young women and men who are implementing innovations in Latin American maize-based agri-food systems. This is the third instalment of the awards, following Asia in October 2018 and Africa in May 2019. The awards ceremony took place at the 23rd Latin American Maize Reunion in Monteria, Colombia on October 9, 2019.

Lucio Reinoso (right) receives the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America from CIMMYT Maize scientists Luis Narro (left) and Felix San Vicente (center). Photo: Carlos Alfonso Cortes Arredondo/CIMMYT.

Young Innovator promotes the production and consumption of native maize in Mexico

Jose Esteban Sotelo Mariche is an agronomist from the coastal region of Oaxaca, Mexico with a specialization in food security and rural development. He works with smallholder native maize farmers, helping them to produce more maize using sustainable practices and to commercialize their native maize in local and international markets. Jose Esteban was recently awarded the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America in the category of change agent for his involvement in this work.

The awards, an initiative of the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), seek to recognize the contributions of young women and men who are implementing innovations in Latin American maize-based agri-food systems. This is the third instalment of the awards, following Asia in October 2018 and Africa in May 2019. The awards ceremony took place at the 23rd Latin American Maize Reunion in Monteria, Colombia on October 9, 2019.

Jose Esteban Sotelo Mariche, center, receives the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America from CIMMYT Maize scientists Luis Narro (left) and Felix San Vicente (right). Photo: Carlos Alfonso Cortes Arredondo/CIMMYT.

Young Innovator Eduardo Cruz Rojo uses biological control methods against fall armyworm

Eduardo Cruz Rojo did not come from a farming family, and never expected to work in agriculture. However, this 26 year old from Alfajayucan, Hidalgo, Mexico with a degree in logistics has been able to earn enough money from agriculture to quit his office job just by employing innovative and sustainable eco-friendly solutions on his maize farm to reduce pests and increase yields—and he is helping other farmers in his community to do the same. Eduardo was recently awarded the MAIZE Youth Innovators Awards 2019 – Latin America in the Farmer category for this work.

The awards, an initiative of the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), seek to recognize the contributions of young women and men who are implementing innovations in Latin American maize-based agri-food systems. This is the third instalment of the awards, following Asia in October 2018 and Africa in May 2019. The awards ceremony took place at the 23rd Latin American Maize Reunion in Monteria, Colombia on October 9, 2019.

Eduardo Cruz Rojo, center, receives the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America from CIMMYT Maize scientists Luis Narro (left) and Felix San Vicente (right). Photo: Carlos Alfonso Cortes Arredondo/CIMMYT.

Young researcher brings edible maize fungus to Mexican tables for better nutrition

Omar Garcilazo Rahme works to help smallholder farmers in Mexico improve their nutrition and livelihoods by cultivating huitlacoche, an edible maize fungus prized by consumers and chefs that is considered a delicacy. Omar developed a new and simple technique that would allow farmers to grow the fungus without having to invest in greenhouses or even change anything about their traditional maize production system, with excellent results. He was recently awarded the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America in the category of researcher for his involvement in this work.

The awards, an initiative of the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), seek to recognize the contributions of young women and men who are implementing innovations in Latin American maize-based agri-food systems. This is the third instalment of the awards, following Asia in October 2018 and Africa in May 2019. The awards ceremony took place at the 23rd Latin American Maize Reunion in Monteria, Colombia on October 9, 2019.

Omar Garcilazo Rahme, center, receives the MAIZE Youth Innovators Award 2019 – Latin America from CIMMYT Maize scientists Luis Narro (left) and Felix San Vicente (right). Photo: Carlos Alfonso Cortes Arredondo/CIMMYT.