A smart solution: Agricultural innovation and gender-aware approaches

smart_combinationIf rural women in developing countries had the same access to land, technology, credit, education and markets as men, their yields could increase by 20 to 30 percent. Estimates show this alone would raise agricultural production in developing countries by 2.5 to 4 percent,1 which could lift 100 to 150 million people out of hunger. Research also shows that the reduction of gender disparities and the empowerment of women leads to better food and nutrition security for households and significantly strengthens other development outcomes such as child education.2,3 Yet, more than 1.1 billion women worldwide do not have equal access to land, inputs and extension.

R4D Review

IITAr4d-review-edition-10-march-2012-1IITA last newsletter is focusing on maize. From the release of Provitamin A maize varieties to breakthroughs in maize breeding, and a special feature on MAIZE CRP, it brings you the latest maize updates.

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New facilities inaugurated in Kenya to aid agriculture in East Africa

Felix Koskei, Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary for Agriculture, unveils the plaque of the Doubled Haploid Facility in Kiboko, Makueni County. Looking on is Bodduppali Prasanna, director of CIMMYT’s Global Maize Program (Left), Thomas Lumpkin, director general of CIMMYT and Ruth Kyatha from the Makueni County Cabinet Secretary for Agriculture.  Photo: Florence Sipalla

Felix Koskei, Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary for Agriculture, unveils the plaque of the Doubled Haploid Facility in Kiboko, Makueni County. Looking on is Bodduppali Prasanna, director of CIMMYT’s Global Maize Program (Left), Thomas Lumpkin, director general of CIMMYT and Ruth Kyatha from the Makueni County Cabinet Secretary for Agriculture. Photo: Wandera Ojanji

CIMMYT, in partnership with the Kenyan Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), established two major maize facilities in Kenya last week. The Maize Doubled-Haploid Facility for Africa at KARI-Kiboko aims to accelerate the development of stress-resilient and nutritionally-improved maize varieties while the Maize Lethal Necrosis Screening Facility at KARI-Naivasha will focus on tackling deadly maize lethal necrosis (MLN).

Gender in maize research

Gender specialist Vongai Kandiwa discussing gender work at CIMMYT and the importance of agricultural scientists taking up gender issues which have tremendous impact on the way people practice agriculture.